Tag: The Flourishing Project

Bucket List Goals: God Overflowing!

“I don’t believe in God, but I miss him.” What a poignantly insightful and profoundly sad opening to a memoir by the atheist Julian Barnes (Nothing to Be Frightened Of). Here is another one, only from G.K. Chesterton: “He who does not believe in God, doesn’t believe in nothing, he believes in anything.” * Now […]

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What’s On Your Bucket List?

The pleasures we pursue are high on that list! You make choices. Every day. Many of your decisions are automatic and you hardly know you’re making them. Others take longer for you to make up your mind. Some decisions are pretty small in the scheme of things (what restaurant will we dine at tonight?). Others […]

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5 Ways to Deal With Your Life Conditions

Your gender, race, ethnicity, age, geographical location, socio-economic status, education, marital status, etc. are examples of life conditions. Some of these are fixed, which means they are very hard to change. Others are in flux, which means they are very open to change, often by you. I’m sure you’ve heard the saying, “The grass is […]

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11 Insights on the Way of Flourishing

On Sunday, I used a word of life from Deuteronomy 30. Today, I want to give you a fuller context, additional references, and a fresh insight about The Way of Flourishing. It would be best if you had a Bible in order to look at these verses in the complete context. I am only going to […]

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Practice Makes You Better (TFP, Day 35)

At everything. Including good things. Especially the things connected with flourishing. It is striking how many principles, lessons, insights, instructions, and commands are in the Bible that tell you to put into practice something good, and strenuously avoid doing what is wrong. You get better at whatever you practice repeatedly. If you practice anger, you […]

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Psalm 36:5-10, A Vision of Flourishing

  In 1976, when I was a sophomore in college, our campus fellowship group met weekly for a large group gathering. We would spend 20 to 30 minutes in worship, have a speaker for about 30 minutes, then spend the rest of the evening hanging out (the Christian words were fellowship and koinoia). The worship music […]

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